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Shiroi Ishi (2001)

The Hilliard Ensemble
Text and music by Ken Ueno
Composed for the Hilliard Ensemble

TEXT:                                                 TRANSLATION:
SHIro i   iSHI                                        White stone          

Tsukiyo  no  umi   ni  SHIzumu             Sinks into a moon-lit ocean

Sono toki hamon wa                             That moment, the ripples are

Nagare boSHI  no  kage                       shadows trailing a shooting star.

The first syllable “SHI” of the word “shiro” (white) has multiple meanings:
1): Four - for the number of performers.
2): Death.
3): Poetry.

This syllable acts as a link between the worlds of pitch and noise/timbre,

as well as word and sound.  Structurally, each successive occurrence of this syllableopens a window of evocation to previous occurrences - the white stone passing into another existence synchronistically being related to another transient moment, that of a shooting star. 

The relationship of the stone and the ripples (and the shooting star and its shadows) is akin to the relationship between consonants and vowels in the Japanese language.  The whole language is built upon five basic vowels (a, i, u, e, o) which are arranged with different consonants in front of the vowels (ex.: ka, ki, ku, ke, ko, ga, gi, gu, ge, go, etc.).  This means that the same five formants create meaning according to what noise elements (consonants) are affixed to the attack of the sound (every sound has three components: an attack, a middle, and a decay).  There is a modular quality to Japanese language since the phonological aspects are so limited.   In changing the rhythm of words and phrases, in stretching phrases, it is possible to derive or hear different meanings from one phrase.  Even without understanding the Japanese, it is hoped that one can follow the statistical prevalence of certain consonants as a way to following the text (as opposed to following melodic phrases).  It is some kind of common ground between Eastern incantation and modern electroacoustic sounds that I am seeking presently as a discourse in setting my text.


Thierry Mugler ‘Anatomique Computer’ Two-Piece Suit AW 1990-91

Thierry Mugler ‘Anatomique Computer’ Two-Piece Suit AW 1990-91

袁莎 Yuan Sha plays 冥山 Ming Shan on the 古筝 guzheng

YouTube video description: Central Conservatory’s Yuan Sha plays Wang Zhong Shan’s Ming Shan, one of the pieces that brought her to the first prize of the 2002 International Chinese Instrumental Competition.

(via samuel wong)

Quantum Mechanics: Animation explaining quantum physics. (by Eugene Khutoryansky)

Me acabo de dar cuenta de que no existe el verbo “compatir” :(

Es un galicismo, se dice “compadecer(-se)”.

the-science-llama:

Jupiter Occultation
Maurice Toet - July 15, 2012

the-science-llama:

Jupiter Occultation

Maurice Toet - July 15, 2012

discardingimages:


fishcat vs. spear rat  Pontifical of Guillaume Durand, Avignon, before 1390.
Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, ms. 143, fol. 161v

discardingimages:

fishcat vs. spear rat 

Pontifical of Guillaume Durand, Avignon, before 1390.

Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, ms. 143, fol. 161v